Top terms for L&D professionals

Mark Oehlert recently asked: “What are the Must-know terms for the Learning Professionals of the 21st Century?” and got the ball rolling with 8 suggested terms. I have no quarrel with any of them, but it got me thinking. In my experience there are some fundamental things that L&D professionals need to be familiar with.

I sat down with a nice cup of tea and came up with some terms to add to Mark’s. I don’t say that I’m an enthusiastic supporter of all of them – only that we need to understand these terms and how they are often used and abused.

By the end of my cuppa I’d reached 120 terms.

 Tell me what – in your opinion – should be on the list and what shouldn’t:

The Academy
Accelerated Learning
Action Learning
Active listening
Adaptive Testing
ADDIE Model
Affective domain
AICC
Anchored Instruction
Andragogy
Apprenticeship
Assessment
Asynchronous Delivery
Attribution Theory
Authoring Tool
Behaviourism
Belbin Types
Benchmarking
Bite-sized Learning
Blended Learning
Blog
Bloom’s Taxonomy
Brain dominance
CBT – you have to have some history, too!
Chunking
Coach
Coffield and Learning Styles and British Educational System
Cognitivism
Cognitive Domain
Collaborative learning
Communities of Practice
Competency
Competency Frameworks
Connectivism
Constructivism
Continuous Professional Development / CPD
Distance Learning
Double Loop Learning
E-Learning
Emotional Intelligence
EPSS – see Performance Support
Evaluation
Experiential Learning
Explicit Knowledge
Floor walking
Gagne
Games & Gaming
Guided discussion
Happy Sheets
Hawthorn effect
Heuristic
Human Capital
Ice Breaker
ILT
Inductive Questioning
Inert knowledge
Informal Learning
Information Processing Theory
Instructional Design
Jung
Just in Time Training
Kirkpatrick Model
Kirton’s Adaption-Innovation Index (KAI)
Knowledge
Knowledge Management
LCMS
Learning
Learning Centre
Learning Myths
Learning Object
Learning Organisation
Learning Preferences
Learning Styles – also see Coffield
Learning Types
LMS
Loafing, Social – not much to do with learning, but certainly to do with performance
Martini – a free one to anyone who makes it this far in the list
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
Mastery Learning
MBTI
Memory
Mentor
Metacognition
Mind Mapping
Mobile learning
Modes of Learning
Moodle
Motivation
Neo-behaviourism
NLP – sorry, Donald, we have to teach the controvesy
On-the-job training
Open Source
Pavlov
Performance Improvement
Performance Support
Personal Development Plan
Personality Types
Piaget
Podcast
Pygmalion Effect
Remedial Training
Return on Investment (ROI)
Rosenthal Effect
Scaffolding
S-a-a-S
SCORM
Self-Managed Learning
Seven Intelligences
Simulation
Six Thinking Hats
Skill
Skills Audit
Skills Framework
Skills Gap
Skills Inventory
Skills Management
Skills Matrix
Skills Shortage
Skinner
Social Learning Theory
Socratic Method
Stories & Narrative
Structural Learning Theory
Symposium, the
Synchronous/Asynchronous learning
Tacit Knowledge
Talent Management
Tolman
Tough
Training
Training Needs Analysis (TNA)
Vygotsky
Watson
Wikis
Work-based Learning
Workforce Development

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5 responses to “Top terms for L&D professionals

  1. Good list Donald. On a quick glance I would add ‘informal learning’ and ‘performance support’ (rather than EPSS), ‘simulations’, ‘games’, ‘stories’, ‘casestudies’, ‘inductive questionning’, ‘assessment’, ‘evaluation’, ‘wikis’, ‘blogs’, ‘podcasts’. I’d spell ‘cognitivism’ right too!

  2. Excellent suggestions, Clive. I will add them soon, and the spelling error is probably worth a beer. (And I suppose it would be churlish to point out that Informal Learning is already on there :-))

  3. Hi Don,

    Wow – what a list! What about adding e-portfolios? It is a term which is being thrown about, particularly within the CPD context, with little understanding.

    Also RSS feeds, these are particularly important, I feel.

  4. Hi Cristina,
    Thanks for leaving the comment – and two excellent suggestions. E-portfolios is a great addition. It’s one of those terms that – as you say – means all things to all people, with particular differences whether you are in the academic sector (where it doubles as a CV and as a sort of diary to facilitate reflection during learning) and the working world, where it is a method of collecting evidence of achievement towards a normally well-defined goal such as an NVQ. RSS Feeds, absolutely, should be included too.

    I have recently moved this list to the Learning Technologies Conference Blog: http://learningtechnologiesconference.wordpress.com/2007/02/04/what-should-an-ld-professional-know/, where I have done a bit of pruning, made some additions, and have started adding links to the topics. Eventually, this list will morph into another form, but I’m keeping it on the LT blog for the moment – check it out (you’ll see that I have added your suggestions).

  5. Pingback: What should an L&D professional know? « Learning Technologies Conference Blog

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